So you too are stuck with a working laptop with an awesome reliance broadband 3G ZTE AC 8710 modem and a gut feeling that it will work with Linux someday….?? … well, you are right, it does work and you are right, it isn’t really a tough thing to do.

I bought my usb 3g ZTE modem from reliance 4 days back and since then had been trying to make it work without success. There are so many tutorials on the net that describe how to set it up and almost all are correct, but as you will soon notice, none of them had enough knowledge for a newbie like me to set it up completely from scratch. So, after trying for many days and giving up every night and then again trying the next day, I was finally able to set it up. However, after living in immortal fear of forgetting my newfound knowledge or my laptop catching electrophobia, I decided to immortalize it by writing it down…. I do want to stress that I write English all day long but it is limited to just a few words like while, for, switch etc …. so it is refreshing to write something else! :) …. I can finally understand the power of a spellchecker!

I hope that this small tutorial helps some of you…. I have tried to provide you with clear details of how to make it work step by step.

Step 1: Make sure you have root login enabled. To see a step by step guide, << click here >>

Step 2: login as root.

Step 3: Find the product and vendor id of your device. To do this, first open a terminal window and then type this lsusb . Keep a note of the contents. The output will be somewhat like this

Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

Bus 008 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 007 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

Bus 005 Device 002: ID 147e:1000

Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Now plug-in your usb reliance netconnect modem and then after about 10 seconds (this is to give enough time for your device to initialize) run lsusb again. Note the output again. This time the output should look something like:

Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

Bus 008 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 007 Device 008: ID 19d2:fff1

Bus 007 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 006 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

Bus 005 Device 002: ID 147e:1000

Bus 005 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0001 Linux Foundation 1.1 root hub

Note the difference in the previous two outputs. This line tells you that the vendor id and the product id. You will have different Ids. 19d2 is the vendor id and fff1 is the product id.

Step 4: The information collected about has to be entered into a special file now. You will have to edit the file /boot/grub/menu.lst.
This file contains kernel options that may be needed while booting your Linux. Take a backup of this file somewhere before editing it.

Now prefix 0x (that’s a zero followed by small X and not o :-). You might have to type this as copying it from here doesn’t seem to work. ) to both and vendor id and product id and create the following string:

“usbserial.vendor=0x19d2 usbserial.product=0xfff1″

This string now has to be added at the end of your default kernel options. If you are like me, then you wouldn’t know what a default kernel option is. Well, nothing but a few words I would say. In fact, the string that you have created is also going to become a default kernel option.

Add this line at the end of default options in your menu.1st
file. Search this file and find out the text that looks like the text below:

title        Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11-generic

uuid        b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c

kernel        /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.28-11-generic root=UUID=b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c ro quiet splash

initrd        /boot/initrd.img-2.6.28-11-generic

quiet

title        Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11-generic (recovery mode)

uuid        b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c

kernel        /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.28-11-generic root=UUID=b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c ro single

initrd        /boot/initrd.img-2.6.28-11-generic

title        Ubuntu 9.04, memtest86+

uuid        b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c

kernel        /boot/memtest86+.bin

quiet

Now edit this text to make it look like the following:

title        Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11-generic

uuid        b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c

kernel        /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.28-11-generic root=UUID=b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c ro quiet splash usbserial.vendor=0x19d2 usbserial.product=0xfff1

initrd        /boot/initrd.img-2.6.28-11-generic

quiet

title        Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11-generic (recovery mode)

uuid        b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c

kernel        /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.28-11-generic root=UUID=b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c ro single usbserial.vendor=0x19d2 usbserial.product=0xfff1

initrd        /boot/initrd.img-2.6.28-11-generic

title        Ubuntu 9.04, memtest86+

uuid        b9135a09-8127-46cb-a3a4-034f8d726f4c

kernel        /boot/memtest86+.bin

quiet

Note that you have just added the string you created earlier as the last kernel option. By the way, these are the entries that you see in the boot menu when you switch on your system.

Step 5: Remove your usb modem, restart your system and again login as root.

Step 6: Now open terminal window and plugin your usb modem. Wait for around 10 seconds and then type dmesg . Note the last text output. It should be something like:

[ 3807.845275] scsi 9:0:0:0: CD-ROM ZTE USB Storage FFF1 2.31 PQ: 0 ANSI: 2

[ 3807.875209] sr1: scsi-1 drive

[ 3807.878298] sr 9:0:0:0: Attached scsi CD-ROM sr1

[ 3807.878443] sr 9:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 5

[ 3808.056232] usb 7-1: USB disconnect, address 7

[ 3809.480183] usb 7-1: new full speed USB device using uhci_hcd and address 8

[ 3809.637358] usb 7-1: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice

[ 3809.644345] usbserial_generic 7-1:1.0: generic converter detected

[ 3809.644487] usb 7-1: generic converter now attached to ttyUSB0

[ 3809.649476] usbserial_generic 7-1:1.1: generic converter detected

[ 3809.655568] usb 7-1: generic converter now attached to ttyUSB1

[ 3809.657429] usbserial_generic 7-1:1.2: generic converter detected

[ 3809.657529] usb 7-1: generic converter now attached to ttyUSB2

[ 3809.659494] usbserial_generic 7-1:1.3: generic converter detected

[ 3809.659594] usb 7-1: generic converter now attached to ttyUSB3

[ 3809.661797] usbserial_generic 7-1:1.4: generic converter detected

[ 3809.662978] usb 7-1: generic converter now attached to ttyUSB4

[ 3934.056124] usb 6-2: new low speed USB device using uhci_hcd and address 2

[ 3934.225376] usb 6-2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice

If you get similar output, then you are almost set. To be honest, I knew nothing of this when I first started and when I saw the above output on my system, I was almost like a pop corn :) ….. You have just crossed the last major hurdle…. your usb modem has been configured for use. What you need now is to set up a connection which will use your usb modem.

Step 7: To proceed from here, you would needwvdial
installed on your machine. If you do not have it, then install it. The easiest way would be to connect your system to an alternate internet connection (maybe wifi or ethernet connection) and then type the following command in the terminal window.apt-get install wvdial

Step 8: You will now need to edit this file
/etc/wvdial.conf
. Modify the contents so that it looks like:

[Dialer Defaults]

Init2 = ATQ0 V1 E1 S0=0 &C1 &D2 +FCLASS=0

Modem Type = Analog Modem

ISDN = 0

Username = ########## #(enter your 10 digit phone number in place of # and remove this text)

Init1 = ATZ

Password = ########## #(enter your 10 digit phone number in place of # and remove this text)

Modem = /dev/ttyUSB0

Baud = 3686400

Phone = #777

stupid mode = 1

Step 9: Use your internet :) ….. This is all; you have configured your Linux to use reliance netconnect connection. You no longer need to be logged in as root to use your internet connection. To connect, type the following in a terminal window from any user sudo wvdial.

You will get the following kind of output on the terminal window:

–> WvDial: Internet dialer version 1.60

–> Cannot get information for serial port.

–> Initializing modem.

–> Sending: ATZ

ATZ

OK

–> Sending: ATQ0 V1 E1 S0=0 &C1 &D2 +FCLASS=0

ATQ0 V1 E1 S0=0 &C1 &D2 +FCLASS=0

OK

–> Modem initialized.

–> Sending: ATDT#777

–> Waiting for carrier.

ATDT#777

CONNECT

–> Carrier detected. Starting PPP immediately.

–> Starting pppd at Thu Apr 30 11:07:30 2009

–> Pid of pppd: 7348

–> pppd: W X`

–> Using interface ppp0

–> pppd: W X`

–> pppd: W X`

–> pppd: W X`

–> pppd: W X`

–> local IP address 115.240.109.243

–> pppd: W X`

–> remote IP address 220.224.141.129

–> pppd: W X`

–> primary DNS address 202.138.97.193

–> pppd: W X`

–> secondary DNS address 202.138.96.2

–> pppd: W X`

–> pppd: W X`

–> pppd: W X`

This means you are connected to the net :)

To disconnect, press CTRL+C.

I hope this works for you as it did for me. I am loving it :) ….

http://thejeshgn.com/2008/01/12/reliance-netconnect-usb-card-on-linux-howto/

http://playingwithsid.blogspot.com/2009/04/reliance-netconnect-usb-card-in-ubuntu.html

These are the links to the pages I referred to while configuring my connection. I did look at many other pages but I still have a copy of these on my system. Thanks Arky and Thejesh! ….. you made ubuntu stay on my system! :-)

So much for electrophobia! LOL

About these ads